Stormwater Management: Auto Repair Industry

 


 

The auto repair industry is home to a variety of hazardous wastes such as motor oil, solvents, antifreeze, brake fluid, and Mercury. These substances need to be handled appropriately or they will become a threat to surrounding ecological systems, including human health. To ensure that these chemicals stay out of our waterways, it is important for auto repair shops to enact a series of Best Management Practices (BMPs).

 


Here are a few tips to keep hazardous chemicals out of our waterways:

 

Have spill kits clearly labeled & available throughout the shop, near drains, and liquid storage containers. Train staff on proper use. Clean up all spills immediately!

 

Use a drip pan under car when unclipping hoses, unscrewing filters, or removing parts. If car will be stored for long periods of time, consider draining all fluids from vehicle.

 

Make funnels and pumps available when dealing with liquids.

 

Use dry methods of clean up: sweep shop rather than mop, use cat litter or rags to soak up spills. Dispose of this waste appropriately. Not all contaminated waste can be placed in the dumpster.

 

Double check that your work area drains are connected to the sanitary sewer system, NOT the storm drain or on-site dry wells. This waste water may need to be pre-treated (ie: oil/water seperator).

 

Purchase non-toxic or the least toxic products available. Avoid chlorinated solvents. Keep all chemicals tightly sealed. Reuse & recycle materials when possible (clearly label these).

 

Maintain all equipment, including drains.

 

More BMPs for Auto Repair Shops: Keep Your Shop in Tune- Ecobiz

 


 

 

Roanoke County: Stormwater Management Ordinance

 

Section 23-5.3 Structural Stormwater Management Practices

   D.  Pretreatment Requirements: Stormwater treatment practices may be required to have an acceptable form of water quality pretreatment. Stormwater infiltration practices or practices having an infiltration component are prohibited, even with pretreatment, in the following circumstances:

          7.   Where stormwater is generated from highly contaminated source areas known as "hotspots" or where stormwater runoff includes a contaminated non-stormwater component;

 Section 23-5.3 Water Quality

     G.  Stormwater discharges from land uses or activities with higher potential pollutant loadings, known as "hotspots", may require the use of specific structural BMPs and pollution prevention practices. Increased pollutants can include hydrocarbons, traces metals, pesticides, and other toxics that are not found in typical stormwater runoff.

The following land uses and activities are designated as stormwater hotspots in County of Roanoke:

 1. Vehicle salvage yards and recycling facilities;

 2. Vehicle fueling stations;

 3. Vehicle service and maintenance facilities;

 4. Vehicle and equipment cleaning facilities;

 5. Fleet storage areas (bus, truck, etc);

 6. Industrial sites;

 7. Marinas (service and maintenance areas);

 8. Outdoor liquid container storage;

 9. Outdoor loading and unloading facilities;

 10. Public works storage areas;

 11. Facilities that generate or store hazardous materials;

 12. Commercial container nursery;

 13. Golf courses;

 14. Chemical storage;

 15. Dry cleaning operations.

 

See also: Roanoke County Stormwater Management Design Manual

 


City of Roanoke: Stormwater Management Ordinance

Section 11.4- 15. Structural Stormwater Management Practices

    D.  Stormwater treatment practices shall be required to have an acceptable form of water quality pretreatment as set forth in the manual. Stormwater infiltration practices or practices having an infiltration component are prohibited, even with pretreatment, in the following circumstances:

           7. Where stormwater is generated from highly contaminated source areas known as "hotspots" or where stormwater runoff includes a contaminated nonstormwater component; or

Section 11.4-16.  Water Quality   

   C.  Additional requirements. Prior to the design of stormwater management systems, applicants are encouraged to consult with the administrator to determine if they are subject to additional stormwater design requirements due to environmental quality concerns at the proposed land-disturbance activity or development site. Situations that are subject to additional requirements are as follows:

          2. Hotspots may require the use of specific structural BMPs and pollution prevention practices as determined by the administrator to meet the goals of this chapter.

 

See also: City of Roanoke Stormwater Management Design Manual


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